Other Academic Opportunities

Secondary Fields

In April of 2006, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences established secondary fields for Harvard College students. Secondary fields provide the opportunity for focused study (four to six half-courses) outside of the primary area of concentration, but they are entirely optional and are not required for graduation. A secondary field may complement the primary area of study in the concentration, or it may be entirely separate. Unlike a joint concentration, no integrative work between the secondary field and the primary concentration is required. The successful completion of a secondary field will appear on a student’s transcript, but no student may receive credit for more than one secondary field.

While secondary fields provide new opportunities for Harvard College students, they also come at a cost. Students who pursue a secondary field will have fewer free electives and may have to give up some advanced work or research opportunities in the concentration. Interested students should discuss the possibilities of work in a secondary field with the relevant adviser in the sponsoring program. They are also encouraged to discuss their plans with the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies in their own concentration, with their Allston Burr Resident Dean, or with other academic advisers before embarking on a secondary field program.

Each secondary field program has its own set of requirements, and some programs offer multiple options for a secondary field. A few rules, however, apply to all programs: only one half-course may count towards a secondary field and any other degree requirement or program (concentration, Core or General Education, language citation, language requirement, etc.); courses taken through cross-registration (if allowed by the secondary field program) will not count towards the College grade point average; and students must adhere to the guidelines and procedures for obtaining credit for study abroad in order to count such courses for a secondary field.

No student may sign up for a secondary field before declaring a concentration. Students are responsible for notifying secondary fields of their interest in the program, for tracking their requirements, for obtaining required signatures, and for submitting all electronic information and signed paperwork to the Office of the Registrar no later than the seventh Monday of their final term, as published in this Handbook. The deadline is firm; no exceptions will be made.

See Fields of Concentration and Secondary Fields or www.secondaryfields.fas.harvard.edu for a list of programs and their requirements. The online tool for tracking requirements and sending electronic information to the Registrar is also available on this site.

Study Abroad

Harvard views study abroad as an invaluable part of every student’s education and strongly encourages students to explore the possibilities for earning degree credit for study in another culture. The Faculty’s Standing Committee on Education Abroad works with the staff of the Office of International Programs (OIP) to develop and monitor the best possible academic opportunities. Details about arranging a program of study abroad for Harvard credit may be found in the Guide to Study Abroad and at the OIP Website, www.fas.harvard.edu/~oip.

Options for Study Abroad

Sophomores, juniors and seniors may study abroad at a foreign university, in a program sponsored by a US university, or in field-based programs. Students may enroll directly in the best universities in the world, or work in the field under leading researchers.

Up to a full year of credit may be granted for study at an accredited institution that is approved by Harvard University for credit transfer. No more than four half-courses of credit may be earned for a term of work; and no more than two half-courses may be earned for a summer of work. A total of eight half-courses may be transferred to Harvard from study abroad.

Students may earn concentration and elective credit, reduce up to two of their Core or General Education requirements, and earn credit toward a language citation from a Harvard language department through academic work completed for degree credit abroad. Specific information about these options is provided on the OIP Website, the Core or General Education Websites (see Core Credit for Study Abroad or Study Abroad During Term Time under General Education), and through the undergraduate advisers in the language departments.

Students planning to study abroad in countries where English is not the first language are encouraged to complete at least one year of study in a language of the host country before going abroad. As part of their academic program during each term abroad, students in non-Anglophone countries will ordinarily be expected to take either an appropriate language course or a course taught entirely in a language of the host country.

Procedures for Earning Degree Credit for Study Abroad

It is important to begin the study abroad planning process early: first-year students are encouraged to begin thinking about how to incorporate this experience into their studies, and all students are encouraged to seek assistance from the Office of International Programs. Students should also consult with their concentration Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies, and their Resident Dean.

Applications for degree credit for study abroad must be completed and submitted before the program of study begins. Online application instructions and materials are available on the OIP Website. The deadlines for submitting applications are March 1 for study abroad during the fall term or full academic year, and October 1 for study abroad during the spring term. See the OIP Website for summer credit application deadlines. Applications may be approved prior to these dates, and students are strongly encouraged to apply early. To be approved for study abroad, a student must be in good academic and disciplinary standing at Harvard College the term immediately preceding the proposed period of study. Unless granted permission by the Administrative Board in advance, a student cannot be granted degree credit for course work that begins when the student is on probation for any reason.

OIP suggests that students consult the office Website (www.fas.harvard.edu/~oip) for detailed guidance on the process for obtaining credit for study abroad, for links to various internet resources. Harvard’s policy regarding credit and sponsorship for undergraduates wishing to travel to countries for which the US State Department has issued a warning also appears on this site.

Students eligible for financial aid may apply to use that aid to pay for term-time study abroad for Harvard credit. Sources for summer funding are listed in the Funding Sources Database. All students earning credit abroad during the academic year will be assessed the student services fee; students will also automatically be billed for health insurance, which may be waived by the deadline with proof of comparable coverage. Students abroad will maintain their Harvard University Identification Number (HUID) and Personal Identification Number (PIN), and have access to Harvard libraries and services.

It is expected that students who study abroad will take a full course-load, as determined and approved by the OIP. Any term for which a student receives four half-courses of degree credit (an approved study abroad term) will reduce by one the number of terms for which a student may register at Harvard College. An approved study abroad term for which full credit was pre-approved, but only partial credit is granted (1–3 half-courses) does not reduce the student’s number of terms at Harvard but may subject the student to an acceleration fee. Such a term of partial credit will also require that the student make up the credit deficiency either by applying a fifth course taken earlier at Harvard, or making up the course in a future term or through Harvard Summer School. See Acceleration, Residence Requirement, and Rate of Work.

Independent Study with a member of a Harvard Faculty while a student is studying for degree credit out of residence is governed by the same policies as Independent Study in residence, except that the Independent Study petition must be reviewed as part of the overall application for study out of residence.

Harvard does not ordinarily grant credit for study out of residence at other US institutions, except in rare cases when such study is judged to offer a “special opportunity” unavailable to the student at Harvard. Information on the process for petitioning for credit for study away within the US can be obtained from the OIP.

Students may cross-register for courses offered by other Harvard Faculties or by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. See Study at Other Boston-Area Institution.

Citations in a Foreign Language

Advanced training in a foreign language is a valuable component of a liberal arts education; it allows students to employ another language in cultural exchange, research, and work. To foster such training, many of the “language and literature” and “language and civilization” departments offer programs in which undergraduates may earn a citation in a modern or ancient language. Those languages in which citations are offered and the specific requirements for each are listed below. The award of a foreign language citation will be noted on the transcript at the time degrees are voted, and will be included in the commencement program. Students will also receive printed citations along with their diplomas.

Each language citation program consists of four half-courses of language instruction beyond the first-year level and/or half-courses taught primarily in the foreign language. At least two of these half-courses must be at the third-year level or beyond. Appropriate courses taken in approved programs of study out of residence for which the student receives Harvard degree credit may be counted toward a citation. Courses that satisfy the requirements for a citation may also be counted toward Core, General Education and/or concentration requirements, as appropriate, but only one half-course may count towards a secondary field (see page 34). Also, some students who complete the requirements for the Citation in Foreign Language are able to satisfy the Foreign Cultures requirement of the Core Program; students who wish to pursue this option must file an application with the General Education Office.

Students must complete all courses to count toward the citation with letter grades of B– or better. Regardless of the level at which a student enters a language program at Harvard, all citations require the completion of four half-courses taken at Harvard or counted for Harvard degree credit. Language courses that meet these criteria but are bracketed on the transcript may be counted toward a language citation. Some programs require that courses be taken in a particular sequence; students should consult the relevant language advisers for more information.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies of the relevant department and file this form with the Registrar no later than the deadline for degree applications in their final term in the College. Students are encouraged to file their intentions to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation as early as the declaration of a concentration so that they may benefit from advising by the department that will provide the recognition. Students will benefit from planning ahead and taking courses in consecutive terms, so as not to lose ground between language courses; this is especially important at the early stages of language study. Students planning their courses around a study-abroad or work-abroad experience should consult with relevant advisers upon their return, as their language experience abroad may have an effect on the courses students may use for the Language Citation. Those students who later decide not to complete the requirements for a citation in a foreign language are asked to complete a new Plan of Study indicating this fact in order to inform the relevant department and the Registrar.

Concentrators, including joint concentrators, in African and African American Studies, the Classics, East Asian Studies, Germanic Languages and Literatures, Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, Romance Languages and Literatures, Sanskrit and Indian Studies, or Slavic Languages and Literatures, whose concentration work is built on a particular language or set of languages, are not also eligible for citations in those languages.

African Languages
(See Gikuyu, Igbo, Swahili, Twi, Yoruba, Zulu)
For all other African languages, please consult the Director of the African Language Program.

Classical Arabic
Four of the following half-courses: Arabic 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 140, 141, 160r, 240r, 245r, 248r.
Other courses taught primarily in Arabic or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Modern Standard Arabic
Four of the following half-courses, including at least two from the third-year or beyond list:
Second-year level: Arabic 110, 121a, 121b.
Third-year or beyond: Arabic 131a, 131b, 241a, 241b.
Other courses taught primarily in Arabic or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Chinese
Four half-courses from the following, of which at least two must be at the third-year level or beyond:
Second-year level: Chinese 120a, 120b, 123xb (Chinese 125ab may count as two half-courses at the second-year level).
Third-year level or beyond: Chinese 130a, 130b, 130xa, 130xb, 140a, 140b, 150a, 150b, 183, 187, 197.

Chinese Bx does not count for a language citation. Other courses taught primarily in Mandarin Chinese or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses only after assessment via a Chinese Placement Test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Literary Chinese
Chinese 106a, 106b, 107a, and 107b.
More advanced courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be
substituted for these courses with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Czech
Slavic Cr, Slavic Cd, and two terms of Slavic Cr (to be defined as third-year, or advanced).
Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Czech) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

French
Four of the following half-courses, including at least two from the list labeled third-year level or beyond:
Second-year level: French Ca, Cb, 25; Foreign Cultures 22a.

Third-year level or beyond: French courses numbered at the 30- to 50-level, or any French course numbered at a higher level conducted in French; Foreign Cultures 21, 22b. Students should consult the online Courses of Instruction for information on citation credit for literature courses numbered 100–199. Students may take no more than two half-courses numbered at each of the 30-level, 40-level, and 50-level.

Students will not receive credit toward a language citation for courses taken out of sequence.

That is, students may not take a second-year course after having taken a third-year course, or a third-year course after having taken a course at the fourth-year level, as indicated by the first digit of the course number. Students will receive neither Harvard nor citation credit for any course designated as equivalent to one they have already taken.

A half-credit toward a citation is granted to students who have enrolled in a French language section (i.e. discussions, readings, and written assignments all in French) of a literature or Core course given in English. This means that students enrolling in French language sections in two classes given in English will receive credit for one half-course toward the four required for a citation.

A maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in French. Courses taken out of residence will count toward a citation in French if the course is taught entirely in French as indicated in the syllabus or course description, and, in the case of summer study, the course lasts five weeks or consists of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in French must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

German
Four of the following half-courses: German Ca, Cb, 61, 62, 65, 66; 71, 72, or any 100-level or 200-level course conducted in German. German Dab counts as a full course.
Other courses taught primarily in German or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies in German.

Gikuyu
The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Gikuyu B (a full course), Gikuyu 101ar, Gikuyu 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Gikuyu, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Gikuyu taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Gikuyu) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Greek
Four half-courses chosen from the following: Greek Ba, Bb, H, K, or any 100-level Greek course, including those in Medieval Greek.

Other advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for one or more of the above with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Classics concentration.

Modern Greek
Four half-courses (or equivalent) chosen from the following: Modern Greek B (a full course), 100, or any other 100-level course in which the reading is done in Modern Greek.

Other advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for one or more of the above with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Classics concentration.

Classical Hebrew
Four of the following half-courses: Classical Hebrew 120a, 120b, 130ar, 130br; Hebrew 150a, 150b, 153, 165, 168, 171, 174, 176.

More advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Modern Hebrew
Four of the following half-courses: Modern Hebrew 120a, 120b, 130r, 131r, or Near Eastern Civilizations 91r if focused on contemporary Israeli literature and culture and conducted in modern Hebrew at the third-year level or beyond.

Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for two of these four courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Hindi (See Urdu and Hindi.)

Igbo
Four terms of AAAS 90r (conducted in Igbo), beyond the first year of language study. Two half-courses must be at the third-year level or beyond.

Other advanced Igbo courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Igbo) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Italian
Four half-courses in Italian designated Italian Ca or above. Italian Dab is a full course and counts as two citation credits at the second-year level. Students should consult the online Courses of Instruction for information on citation credit for literature courses numbered 100–199.

Students will not receive credit toward a language citation for courses taken out of sequence.

That is, students may not take a second-year course after having taken a third-year course, or a third-year course after having taken a course at the fourth-year level, as indicated by the first digit of the course number. Students will receive neither Harvard nor citation credit for any course designated as equivalent to one they have already taken.

A half-credit toward a citation is granted to students who have enrolled in an Italian language section (i.e. discussions, readings, and written assignments all in Italian) of a literature or Core course given in English. This means that students enrolling in Italian language sections in two classes given in English will receive credit for one half-course toward the four required for a citation.

Other courses taught primarily in Italian or a maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in Italian. Courses taken out of residence will count toward a citation in Italian if the course is taught entirely in Italian as indicated in the syllabus or course description, and, in the case of summer study, the course lasts six weeks or consists of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Italian must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

Japanese
Four half-courses from the following: Japanese 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 140a, 140b, 150a, 150b.

Other courses taught primarily in Japanese or language courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses only after assessment via a Japanese Placement Test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Korean
Four half-courses from the following: Korean 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 140a, 140b, 150a, 150b.

More advanced courses or language courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses only after assessment via a Korean Placement Test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Latin
Four half-courses chosen from the following: Latin Ba, Bam, Bb, H, K, or any 100-level Latin course, including those in Medieval Latin.
Other advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for one or more of the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Classics concentration.

Persian
Persian 120a, 120b, 140ar, 140br.
More advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Polish
Slavic Dc, Slavic Dd, and two terms of Slavic Dr (to be defined as third-year, or advanced).
Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Polish) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

Portuguese
Four half-courses in Portuguese beyond the A level and that are conducted in Portuguese. Students should consult the online Courses of Instruction for information on citation credit for literature courses numbered 100–199.

Students will not receive credit toward a language citation for courses taken out of sequence.

That is, students may not take a second-year course after having taken a third-year course, or a third-year course after having taken a course at the fourth-year level, as indicated by the first digit of the course number. Courses having the same prerequisites, however, may be taken interchangeably. In unusual cases, the undergraduate adviser in Portuguese may approve an exception to this rule.

Other courses taught primarily in Portuguese or a maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in Portuguese. Courses taken out of residence will count toward a citation in Portuguese if the course is taught entirely in Portuguese as indicated in the syllabus or course description, and, in the case of summer study, the course lasts six weeks or consists of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Portuguese must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

Russian
The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Slavic B or Bab (each a full course), Slavic 101, 102, 103, 104, 109, 110, or any advanced Russian language course at the level of 111 or above.

Other advanced courses in Russian, courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit, or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Russian) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

Sanskrit
Sanskrit 102a, 102b, and any two 200-level courses in Sanskrit.
Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or Sanskrit 91r may be substituted for
these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Sanskrit and Indian Studies concentration.

Slavic Languages
See Czech, Polish, Russian, and Ukrainian.
For information about studying other Slavic languages (for example, Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian), please speak with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Spanish
Four of the following half-courses beyond the A level:
Second-year level: Spanish C and 30.
Third-year level or beyond: Spanish courses at the 40, 50, 60 and 65 level; or any Spanish course numbered at a higher level conducted in Spanish; Foreign Cultures 33, 37.

Students should consult the online Courses of Instruction for information on citation credit for literature courses numbered 100–199.

Students will not receive credit toward a language citation for courses taken out of sequence.

That is, students may not take a second-year or a third year course after having taken a course at the 70, 90, or 100-level. Students will receive neither Harvard nor citation credit for any course designated as equivalent to one they have already taken.

A half-credit toward a citation is granted to students who have enrolled in a Spanish language section (i.e. discussions, readings, and written assignments all in Spanish) of a literature or Core course given in English. This means that students enrolling in Spanish language sections in two classes given in English will receive credit for one half-course toward the four required for a citation.

Other courses taught primarily in Spanish or a maximum of two courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the undergraduate adviser in Spanish. Courses taken out of residence will count toward a citation in Spanish if the course is taught entirely in Spanish as indicated in the syllabus or course description, and, in the case of summer study, the course lasts six weeks or consists of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Students who plan to satisfy the requirements for a foreign language citation in Spanish must complete a Foreign Language Citation Study Plan with the Director of Language Programs in Romance Languages and Literatures (Boylston Hall 436, 617-495-2524).

Swahili
The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Swahili B (a full course), Swahili 101ar, Swahili 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Swahili, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Swahili taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Swahili) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consists of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Swedish
Swedish Ba and Bb, or the equivalent taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Scandinavian.

Two terms of third-year or beyond Swedish language and culture courses. These may consist of any tutorial or 100-level course conducted in Swedish, Supervised Reading and Research courses conducted in Swedish (Scandinavian 91r), or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Scandinavian.

Classical Tibetan
Tibetan 103 and any three 200-level courses in Tibetan.

Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Sanskrit and Indian Studies concentration.

Turkish
Four of the following half-courses: Turkish 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 149.
More advanced courses or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Twi
The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Twi B (a full course), Twi 101ar, Twi 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Twi, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Twi taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Twi) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Ukrainian
Four terms of Slavic Gr, two to be defined as third-year, or advanced.
Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or Slavic 91r (if conducted in Ukrainian) may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Slavic Languages and Literatures concentration.

Urdu and Hindi
The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Urdu 102 (a full course), 103a, 103b, 104, 105r, 106.
Courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses with the permission of the Head Tutor of the Sanskrit and Indian Studies concentration.

Vietnamese
Vietnamese 120a, 120b, 130a, 130b, 140, and 140b.
Language courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for these courses only after assessment via a Vietnamese Placement Test and with the permission of the East Asian Language Coordinator (eal@fas.harvard.edu).

Yiddish
The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Yiddish B, Ca, Cb, 102r, 103r, 105, 200r, 202r, 204.
Other courses taught primarily in Yiddish or courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit may be substituted for the above courses with the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations concentration.

Yoruba
The equivalent of four terms selected from among the following: Yoruba B (a full course), Yoruba 101ar, Yoruba 101br, or AAAS 90r (if conducted in Yoruba, with permission from the Director of the Language Program).

Other advanced courses in Yoruba taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Yoruba) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Zulu
Four terms of AAAS90r (conducted in Zulu), beyond the first year of language study. Two half-courses must be at the third-year level or beyond.

Other advanced Zulu courses taken out of residence for Harvard degree credit or AAAS 91r (if conducted in Zulu) may be substituted for these courses with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Department of African and African American Studies. In the case of summer study, the course must last six weeks or consist of at least 50 class hours; in addition, students must submit some graded written work done for the course.

Advanced Standing

Full information concerning Advanced Standing is available in a publication, Advanced Standing at Harvard College. Questions about the program should be addressed to the Allston Burr Resident Dean or the Advising Programs Office (617-496-6354).

Advanced Placement
Freshmen who believe that they have completed in secondary school the equivalent of an introductory college-level Advanced Placement course and who have taken a College Board Advanced Placement Examination in the appropriate subject and received a qualifying score in that examination should consult the department concerned if they wish to receive advanced placement for their work. The qualifying scores and policies set by each Harvard department for its field may also be found in Advanced Standing at Harvard College. Harvard does not administer its own Advanced Placement examinations except in seven fields where there are no College Board Advanced Placement Examinations: Chinese, Ancient Greek, Hebrew (Modern), Japanese, Korean, Music (Harmony), and Russian. These tests are given only during Opening Days.

Advanced Standing
New students, excepting all those admitted as transfer students from other colleges, will be eligible for Advanced Standing if they have completed four or more college-level Advanced Placement courses and have received advanced placement at Harvard in those courses by receiving qualifying scores on the College Board Advanced Placement examinations. (Some examinations are granted only one half-course credit toward Advanced Standing. Consult Advanced Standing at Harvard College for details.)

Advanced Standing is designed for students who wish to accelerate their study and for those ready to undertake specialized work early. An eligible student who wishes to use Advanced Standing to graduate after only six or seven terms in the College or, if accepted, remain a fourth year to pursue one of several specific Master’s degree programs, must activate Advanced Standing by the advertised deadline for degree applications during the third term before the student intends to complete the undergraduate requirements (consult Advanced Standing at Harvard College, and the Academic Calendar for details).

Advanced Standing-eligible students who are considering pursuing the AB/AM degree program may, with the permission of the Administrative Board, “bracket” certain courses in their second, third, or fourth year. “Bracketed” courses are not counted toward the bachelor’s degree and the GPA calculations or honors recommendations, but count toward the master’s degree. (“Bracketed” courses are so called because they appear in brackets on the transcript.) The last date for “bracketing” courses is the fifth Monday of the term in which the course is being taken. Petitions to retroactively “bracket” courses may be considered by the Administrative Board from candidates admitted for the AB/AM degrees. If a student does not enroll in the AB/AM program, or does not complete the AB/AM program, any courses that he or she may have “bracketed” earlier will be automatically “unbracketed.”

For specific information on the number of letter-graded courses and the total course requirements for the degree required of Advanced Standing students, see Course Requirements for the Degree.

Foreign Credentials
Students presenting foreign credentials (e.g., British A levels, French Baccalauréat, Swiss Maturité scores) may be eligible for Advanced Standing upon evaluation of individual credentials and upon recommendation of the Committee on International Credentials. Students who have earned the International Baccalaureate diploma with scores of 7 on three Higher Level examinations may also qualify. For further information, please consult the Advising Programs Office.

Study at Other Boston-Area Institutions

From time to time, students with strong academic plans wish to incorporate in those plans one or more courses at a local college or university with which Harvard does not have a cross-registration agreement, while continuing to be enrolled and take courses in the College. (The Faculty of Arts and Sciences has cross-registration agreements with the other Harvard Faculties and with MIT; see Cross-Registration.) Such students wishing to earn Harvard degree credit during a given term for one or two courses that are not available at Harvard and that contribute to a compelling academic plan tied to their concentration, endorsed by their Head Tutor or Director of Undergraduate Studies, may petition the Administrative Board by the appropriate deadline for the term in which the student wishes to include courses elsewhere in their plans of study. It is each student’s responsibility to gain admission to and pay for the instruction at the other institution and to present a transcript from the other institution for the work completed at the end of the term, following the usual procedures for study out of residence. Harvard tuition is reduced for these students on a per-course basis for each course taken elsewhere for Harvard degree credit, and those students eligible for financial aid may apply their aid to the costs of studying at the other institution. Provided that their combined program at Harvard and the other institution adds up to a full load, students may continue in College housing subject to the ordinary eligibility rules. All other administrative procedures and limitations on the overall amount of credit a student may earn out of residence follow the policies for full-time study out of residence (see Procedures for Earning Degree Credit for Study Abroad). For more information, a student should consult his or her Resident Dean of Freshmen or Allston Burr Resident Dean.

The Undergraduate Teacher Education Program

The Undergraduate Teacher Education Program (UTEP) permits a student to obtain a license (or “certificate”) to teach in middle and/or secondary public schools in Massachusetts and the 40+ states with which Massachusetts has reciprocity. UTEP is not a concentration in itself but meant to complement a concentration.

Participation in the program requires approval of the UTEP admissions committee, which considers applications from students as early as the spring term in their sophomore year, or as late as the spring term in their junior year. Current seniors and freshmen are not eligible to apply. The admissions process includes an interview and submission of an application, academic records, recommendations, a resume, and a Plan of Study. Students should have a B– or higher cumulative grade point average when they apply, and should also have some experience working with youth (e.g., as a camp counselor, tutor, coach).

To be eligible for licensure through UTEP, students must complete the following requirements:

  1. Subject Matter: Content expertise in an academic field taught in middle or secondary schools. UTEP offers preparation to teach biology, chemistry, earth science, English, general science (middle school only), history, mathematics, physics, and political science/political philosophy (social studies).

  2. Perspectives Courses: One half-course addressing psychological perspectives on human development; one half-course addressing educational perspectives on schools, curricula, and teachers; and one half-course focused on planning curricula in the subject for which the student is seeking a license. A list of eligible courses is available in the Teacher Education Program Office, Longfellow Hall, Room 310A, Graduate School of Education, or on the UTEP Website.

  3. Field Work (pre-practicum): One term of weekly classroom observations (6 hours per week; 78 hours total) in an approved public school setting.

  4. Student Teaching (practicum): 360 hours of supervised student teaching. This experience counts as one half-course and must be taken at the Graduate School of Education, but only after satisfying requirements 1–3.

Ideally, all UTEP courses and field work should be completed within the junior and/or senior year. However, students may apply for special-student status in the Harvard Graduate School of Education to complete the student teaching and seminar requirements in the first term after graduation. This is known as the Term-After Option. UTEP is also piloting another option for completing the program requirements. This would require students to spend a summer student teaching at the Cambridge-Harvard Summer Academy, along with taking relevant modules at the Graduate School of Education. This would be followed, in the fall semester, by the practicum, teaching methods course, and the course on educational perspectives. This allows undergraduates to complete the UTEP requirements with as little disruption as possible to their college coursework.

Interested students are encouraged to inquire about the program at any time. Questions should be directed to the UTEP Director, who is responsible for advising program participants. For further information, please contact the Teacher Education Program Office at the Graduate School of Education, Longfellow Hall, Room 310, 617-495-2783, or visit the UTEP Website: www.hcs.harvard.edu/utep/.