Academic Performance

All students are required to maintain a satisfactory academic record and meet the obligations of the courses in which they are enrolled. Failure to do so will be dealt with as the Faculty and its designated Boards shall determine. In all cases, midyear grades in full year courses will be considered along with all other grades in the calculations for minimum requirements and satisfactory records.

Minimum Requirements

To meet the minimum academic requirements in any term, a student may have at most one failing grade, which may not be accompanied by another unsatisfactory grade; and at least two satisfactory grades, one of which must be a letter grade in an FAS course taken for degree credit (or in a course taken by cross-registration and counted toward concentration or UTEP requirements). A student who fails to meet the minimum requirements ordinarily will be required to withdraw for two terms, whether or not his or her previous record was unsatisfactory.

Satisfactory and Unsatisfactory Academic Records

The requirements for a satisfactory academic record are satisfactory grades in all courses, and at least one letter grade in an FAS course taken for degree credit (or in a course taken by cross-registration and counted toward concentration or UTEP requirements). However for freshmen in their first term, an academic record will be considered satisfactory if all grades are passing, at most one grade is unsatisfactory, and at least one grade is a satisfactory letter grade. A student whose record is unsatisfactory is ordinarily placed on probation. A student with two consecutive unsatisfactory records ordinarily will be required to withdraw for two terms.

Exclusion from a Course

A student who neglects any course may, after written warning by the instructor, be excluded from the course by the instructor with the approval of the Administrative Board. The warning should specify the steps the student must take in order to be allowed to continue in the course. Exclusion from a course is equivalent in all respects to failing it and in and of itself makes the student’s record for the term unsatisfactory. A notation of EXLD (excluded) on the transcript indicates that the student was not permitted to continue in the course and received no credit. A student may not withdraw from a course from which he or she has been excluded. Students excluded from a course are denied any right to further course evaluation, including final and makeup examinations.

Submission of Written Work

Students are responsible for ensuring that required written course work is submitted and received on time. Written work should not be left in open mailboxes or other unattended places but rather given personally and directly to the head of the course or to a responsible person acting on his or her behalf. Papers that are mailed to instructors should be sent by certified mail, and a receipt of delivery should be requested from the Postal Service. The student should keep both the postal receipt and a copy of the paper. If work is submitted electronically, students are responsible for confirming receipt.

Academic Dishonesty

Plagiarism and Collaboration

All homework assignments, projects, lab reports, papers, and examinations submitted to a course are expected to be the student’s own work. Students should always take great care to distinguish their own ideas and knowledge from information derived from sources. The term “sources” includes not only primary and secondary material published in print or online, but also information and opinions gained directly from other people.

The responsibility for learning the proper forms of citation lies with the individual student. Quotations must be placed properly within quotation marks and must be cited fully. In addition, all paraphrased material must be acknowledged completely. Whenever ideas or facts are derived from a student’s reading and research or from a student’s own writings, the sources must be indicated (see also Submission of the Same Work to More Than One Course)

A computer program written to satisfy a course requirement is, like a paper, expected to be the original work of the student submitting it. Copying a program from another student or any other source is a form of academic dishonesty; so is deriving a program substantially from the work of another.

The amount of collaboration with others that is permitted in the completion of assignments can vary, depending upon the policy set by the head of the course. Students must assume that collaboration in the completion of assignments is prohibited unless explicitly permitted by the instructor. Students must acknowledge any collaboration and its extent in all submitted work.

Students are expected to be familiar with the booklets Writing with Sources and Writing With Internet Sources, which they receive freshman year and are available under “Resources for Students” at www.fas.harvard.edu/~expos. Students who are in any doubt about the preparation of academic work should consult their instructor and Resident Dean before the work is prepared or submitted.

Students who, for whatever reason, submit work either not their own or without clear attribution to its sources will be subject to disciplinary action, and ordinarily required to withdraw from the College.

Submission of the Same Work to More Than One Course

It is the expectation of every course that all work submitted to it will have been done solely for that course. If the same or similar work is to be submitted to any other course, the prior written permission of the instructor must be obtained. If the same or similar work is to be submitted to more than one course during the same term, the prior written permission of all instructors involved must be obtained. A student who submits the same or similar work to more than one course without such prior permission is subject to disciplinary action, and ordinarily will be required to withdraw from the College. Students are urged to consult their Resident Dean or the instructors involved with questions concerning this important matter (see also Plagiarism and Collaboration).

Tutoring Schools and Term Paper Companies

In keeping with the principle that all material submitted to a course should be the student’s own work, any undergraduate who makes use of the services of a commercial tutoring school or term paper company is liable to disciplinary action. Students who sell lecture or reading notes, papers, translations, or who are employed by a tutoring school or term paper company, are similarly liable and may be required to withdraw. If a student wishes to accept compensation for private tutoring in Harvard courses, prior written permission of the Dean of the College is required.

Official Forms and Petitions

Students should understand that providing false or misleading information or signing any other person’s name or initials on a study card, Plan of Study, change-of-course petition, registration form, or on any other official form or petition will make them subject to disciplinary action, including requirement to withdraw.

Human Subjects Research

University regulations and federal rules require advance review and approval of most human subject research. Any living person from or about whom information is collected for a scholarly study is deemed a “research subject”—the term is not limited only to those subjects involved in clinical or laboratory studies. Faculty and students contemplating a research project involving humans as subjects, whether or not the work is externally funded and regardless of the area of academic discipline, should ascertain whether the project requires review.

Committee on the Use of Human Subjects
Committee Staff:

Betsy Draper, Protocol Coordinator, 50 Church St., Room 541, 617-496-CUHS, cuhs@fas.harvard.edu
Jane Calhoun, 50 Church Street, Room 533, 617-495-5459, jcalhoun@fas.harvard.edu
Elizabeth Bowie, 50 Church St., Room 542, 617-496-6087, ebowie@fas.harvard.edu
Ken Carson, 50 Church Street, Room 534, 617-495-9829, kcarson@fas.harvard.edu
Rachel Krebs, 50 Church Street, Room 542, 617-496-1185, rkrebs@fas.harvard.edu
Emiko Saito, 50 Church Street, 5th Floor, 617-496-2618, esaito@fas.harvard.edu

The Standing Committee on the Use of Human Subjects in Research, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ federally mandated Institutional Review Board, is responsible for reviewing proposed studies. Applications should be submitted two weeks prior to Committee meetings, which are held monthly throughout the academic year. Judging from the information provided on the application, the Committee determines whether the proposed procedures will adequately safeguard the rights and welfare of the subjects. The Committee also aims to insure the appropriate recruiting practices, permissions, and student time commitments. Some projects may not require full Committee review; others may be exempt from review altogether. Students planning research projects should contact a Committee staff member to determine whether review is required. Forms, meeting schedule, and reference material are available at www.cuhs.harvard.edu.

Research Involving Animal Subjects

www.fas.harvard.edu/~research/approvals/iacuc.html

University regulations and federal rules require advance review and approval of all vertebrate research prior to its commencement. The Committee on the Use of Animals in Research and Teaching, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ federally mandated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), is responsible for reviewing proposed studies. There are no submission deadlines; applications may be submitted anytime.

IACUC administration services are provided by staff in the office of Research Administration Services (RAS). Information and forms may be obtained from the IACUC Manager (lane@fas.harvard.edu). All individuals using vertebrate animals in research and/or teaching must participate in the institution’s occupational health program and complete a course entitled “The Humane Care of Animals in Research/Teaching.” This course is offered four times per year and acquaints the participants with Harvard policies as well as federal, state, and City of Cambridge regulations regarding the use of animals. Information regarding the occupational health program and course dates and times may be obtained from the Occupational Health Program Coordinator (majkut@fas.harvard.edu).

The Office of Animal Resources (OAR) is the unit responsible for the housing, daily care, and health and well-being of all vertebrate animals used on campus at the FAS. No vertebrate animals may be obtained without the permission of the Office of Animal Resources (617-496-9989).

All members of the Harvard community have a responsibility to report instances of mistreatment of animals or non-compliance with animal use guidelines. To report the mistreatment of vertebrate animals in research or teaching at Harvard, contact the Director of the Office of Animal Resources, Arthur Lage, D.V.M. (617-432-1289). Anonymity will be honored if desired.